Liberalscum Buster

August 7, 2008

AS A KID, HE WAS PUNK McNASTY. THEN HE WAS A HOT DOG RISK TAKING FLYBOY

Filed under: BARACK OBAMA, Bush, hillary clinton, John McCain, life, mideast, news, politics, war — gasdocpol @ 3:31 pm

HE GOT INTO THE NAVAL ACADEMY BECAUSE HIS FATHER WAS A 4 STAR ADMIRAL HE WAS A LOUSY STUDENT THERE. HE WAS IN COMBAT FOR 20 HOURS AND A POW FOR 5 1/2 YEARS. IN THE SENATE HE HAS BEEN SUPERSTITIOUS AND PROFANE RISK TAKING COMPULSIVE GAMBLER AT CRAPS TABLES.

JOHN McCAIN IS GW BUSH ON STEROIDS.

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2 Comments »

  1. My friendship with John McCain
    By Captain Frank Gamboa, USN (Ret.)/For the Sun-News
    Article Launched: 08/07/2008 12:00:00 AM MDT

    My friendship with John McCain began when we were assigned to the same company at the United States Naval Academy as freshmen. We became friends and later decided to be roommates the next year.

    John and I came from vastly different backgrounds. He was from a legendary, American Military family whose record of honorable service dates from the start of our nation. I am a first-generation American citizen. My parents were born in Mexico. To escape the Mexican revolution, they came to America early in the 20th century, with only the clothes they were wearing and their bags, but with hope in their hearts. John entered Annapolis right out of high school. I entered after two years of junior college.

    Because John and I lived in close quarters 24 hours a day for three years, we got to know each other very well. John McCain’s parents, Captain and Mrs. Jack McCain, lived on Capitol Hill in Washington. I learned about Navy culture from them; they treated me like a son, inspired me and gave me confidence. I got to know John McCain’s family, John’s character, his values and his heart. Despite our different backgrounds, we found common values and purpose in the Naval Academy.

    Young men and women go to the Naval Academy to become officers and leaders. We were tested by the upperclassmen to determine whether we had the character to lead and command with competence and concern for our people. The seniors wanted to find out if we understood the obligation of service to country that we had sworn to defend. Regardless of who we were, the upperclassmen would find out if we had the right stuff.

    Equally importantly, we learned the same about our classmates — we learned who we could trust, who we could count on when we needed help.

    One day at lunch in the mess hall I saw John’s true mettle. We sat at a table with Midshipmen we did not know. As we ate, I sensed that John was tensing up. He had noticed the senior was mistreating a Filipino messman who was serving food to our table and could not bear to ignore it. I heard him say to the senior at the head of the table, “Mister, you are picking on that steward!” Startled, the senior replied “What did you say Mister?” John said, “That steward is doing the best he can so why are you picking on him?” This time the red-faced senior snarled, “What’s your name, Mister?” John shot back, “McCain, what’s yours?” The senior stared at John in disbelief. I was almost choking on my food — to stand up to an upperclassman was unheard of at the Academy. John had reacted instinctively without regard to personal consequences, demonstrating courage and daring I had never seen. Embarrassed, the senior abruptly got up and left the table.

    This incident became legend among our classmates. We were amazed at John’s moral courage and bravery. He was fearless. He became our moral compass through his displays of of courage and leadership. He was only 18 years old.

    Many years later I learned of his torture as a prisoner of war, and of his heroic conduct. I was not surprised that he resisted so courageously, or that he had put the welfare of his fellow prisoners and his country before his own self-interest.

    I know John McCain as a person; his character and his values. He is a good and decent man. I know he will look after the best interests or our country and of our Hispanic community.

    Throughout our nation’s history, in times of crises Americans have chosen strong, bold and visionary men to serve as our president. As a nation, we can solve all our problems — if we are properly summoned and honorably led. John McCain will call on the best in each of us. He has the character and judgment to lead the American people to a better future. That is why I support him to be our next president.

    Capt. Frank Gamboa, USN (Ret.) is the first Mexican American to command an amphibious squadron of ships in the U.S. Navy, the first to command a ship as a commander, and later, as a captain. He later served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Equal Opportunity Policy.

    Comment by Johne37179 — August 7, 2008 @ 7:36 pm

  2. Johne,

    John McCain is your friend. His family was nice to you. I can understand your loyalty. I suspect that his behavior at the Naval Academy was tolerated because of the fact that his grandfather was a 4 star admiral and his father was a fourstriper on his way to admiral. I would say that McCain bypassed much of the character-building that other midshipmen were subjected to. I suspect that many of your upperclassmen were of the opinion that he did NOT have the right stuff. However, he was not subjected to the same scruteny as others.

    I know that the service academies have the highest academic standards and in addition require adherence to strict military discipline and to a rigorous character building regimen. The great majority of graduates do very very well whether they join the fleet or they chose some completely completely different career.

    I know also that in the service academies, exceptions are made if a cadet or a midshipman happens to have some strong political pull, or have a powerful relative or some other reason such as being All-American in football.

    According to you character is McCain’s strong suit. I have come to just the opposite conclusion.
    for the following reasons, many of which you know far better than I.

    At the USNA,

    He did not follow rules. He did his own thing.
    He did not treat others with respect.
    He did not play by the rules.
    He did not deal peacefully with anger, insults and disagreements.
    He did not use good manners and clean language.
    He was fifth from the bottom of his class therefore he did not do his best academically.

    In the Navy

    While Executive Officer and later as Squadron Commander of the Replacement Air Group, McCain used his authority to arrange frequent flights that allowed him to carouse with subordinates and “engage in extra-marital affairs.” Such behavior was a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice rules against adultery and fraternization with subordinates.

    As a Senator attributes that have distinquished McCain are superstitions, compulsive gambling and an anger management problem. It is very easy for me to see how these defects can affect his decision making.

    So much for character.

    Experience means nothing if there is not the acquision of good judgement as a result. There is a difference between 20 years of experience and one year of experience 20 times.

    Although there are many Senators and Congressmen (and Congresswomen)who have deep and wide understanding of the issues and could easily move from Congress to the White House (ex. Lyndon Johnson and Gerald Ford) and JFK who had a short learning curve, there is no guarantee that ANY Senator could do that easily. A Senator discusses issues in committee and votes, and does not have the responsibility for making anything other than their staff go and may even have a chief of staff that does much of that.

    The only experience that McCain in making something go was the year or so at the RAG and I will not speculate which part of his anatomy was most actively going.

    McCain is at best a veteran who has served honorably and was able to survive as a POW for 5 1/2 years. You are going by McCain’s unconfirmed account of his internment. There are some equally unconfirmed accounts of his internment that do not do him credit to say the least.

    Comment by gasdocpol — August 7, 2008 @ 10:08 pm


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